Side effects of ginger

Despite the fact that ginger is one of the most healthy roots on the planet, it also can cause a number of side effects, especially if consumed in excess. According to herbalists, the consumption of more than 4 grams of ginger a day can lead to heartburn, gas, bloating, nausea, or stomach problems. Moreover, certain groups of people, including pregnant women, patients with diabetes suffering from ulcer, inflammation, gall stones and bleeding disorders, it is recommended not to use it at all. This spice also interacts with blood-thinning medications such as warfarin and aspirin.

The benefits and harms of ginger

Side effects of ginger

Thanks to its powerful healing properties, ginger is part of Asian culinary tradition and the practice of natural healing for over 5,000 years. It is also one of the most widely used herbs in the modern world. In Ayurveda ginger is known as the universal medicine of wide spectrum of action, mainly aimed at ensuring proper digestion. If food is well processed and absorbed by the body, the latter is not clogged with slag. Even if the toxins formed with the help of ginger, they can be effectively removed. In Chinese medicine, for example, ginger is used as an antidote in cases of poisoning by food or drugs, which only confirms its detoxifying properties.

Side effects of ginger

It may seem unexpected that such healthy the grass is, in fact, may present a threat to him. The fact that the use of large quantities of ginger enhances the effect of warfarin, which causes heartburn, bloating, nausea, gas, or stomach problems. And that’s not all. It also increases the risk of bleeding, especially when used in powder form.

Who should not use ginger?

There are several groups of people who are ginger are contraindicated.

  • People with ulcers or PZK. Fresh ginger can cause intestinal blockage, so people suffering from inflammatory diseases or sores are advised to avoid this plant.
  • People with bleeding disorders. Increasing blood circulation, ginger increases the risk of bleeding, especially in people initially have problems with blood clotting and are taking the appropriate drugs.
  • People with gallstones. Ginger stimulates the production of bile, so it is not recommended for those who suffer from gallstones.

Who should not use ginger?

  • Pregnant women. A number of studies have established a link between ginger and reduce the absorption of dietary iron and fat-soluble vitamins in pregnant women. Ginger can also cause uterine contractions. If you are pregnant, then before adding ginger to your diet, it is strongly recommended to consult experts in the field of health or a licensed herbalist. In addition, avoid drinking ginger tea, especially in the last trimester because it is associated with an increased risk of bleeding.
  • People who are scheduled for surgery. A 2007 study found that the use of ginger before surgery increases the risk of internal bleeding. Experts in health suggest to stop the intake of ginger tea two weeks before surgery.
  • People who are taking certain medications. As mentioned above, ginger interacts with certain medications, including anticoagulants, barbiturates, beta-blockers, or insulin antiplatelet therapy. It also prevents the effects of a number of other medications, including antacids, as it stimulates acid production in the stomach. People who are taking medications for heart, and antihistamines for the treatment of cancer, should avoid this plant.

Who should not use ginger

  • People with diabetes and/or hypertension. Ginger may reduces blood sugar levels and blood pressure, so people who take drugs for diabetes or hypertension, need to consult with a health care professional before taking ginger in any form. Ginger tea should be avoided when taking these blood-thinning drugs as warfarin and aspirin.
  • Ginger suppresses appetite. According to a study published in 2012, ginger reduces appetite by providing a feeling of satiety. The authors of the study explain that it affects the serotonin levels in the blood, and therefore, a deterrent effect on the appetite. This means that ginger should be avoided by people who are trying to gain weight.
  • Ginger interacts with some herbs. Apart from these medicines, ginger can also interfere with the action of herbs that stimulate circulation of blood and retard blood coagulation. This, in particular, cloves, garlic, Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, turmeric, Angelica. The reception of the ginger together with these herbs is associated with a higher risk of bleeding.